In the news – health and nutrition research

In this week’s article we provide a roundup of some of the most recent health and nutrition related articles in the news, five items comprising:

    • You can’t exercise away poor dietary choices, study finds
    • Study: Vitamin D deficiency raises risk of death from COVID by 50%
    • Vitamin B6 may reduce anxiety symptoms, study shows
    • Whether you’re 18 or 80, lifestyle may be more important than age in determining dementia risk, study reveals
    • Could eating fruit more often keep depression at bay

You can’t exercise away poor dietary choices, study finds

There has been a lot of conversation — and a great deal of research — attempting to determine whether exercise or a healthy diet is more important for longevity. A new study led by researchers from the University of Sydney in Australia analysing UK Biobank data may provide the answer.

For anyone who believed that one can exercise away poor dietary choices, this study suggests otherwise.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog:

Supporting health during exercise and training

Study: Vitamin D deficiency raises risk of death from COVID by 50%

Patients with a Vitamin D deficiency have as much as a 50% higher probability of death from COVID-19, according to a study by researchers in Israel and Russia.

The study, published in the Israel Medical Association Journal, analysed published clinical trials showing patients with low vitamin D levels are more prone to infection from COVID-19, and severe illness and death from the disease, the Jerusalem Post reported.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog:

Vitamin D and healthy hormone balance

Vitamin B6 may reduce anxiety symptoms, study shows

Everyone may feel anxious or sad at times. However, some people may experience life-disrupting levels of these emotions on a regular basis, developing into a mental health disorder that requires treatment.

Researchers at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom studied the impact of vitamins B6 and B12 to see how well either vitamin may work at reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Study participants took high doses of their assigned vitamin for about a month. Participants who took vitamin B6 saw a statistically significant reduction in anxiety symptoms, indicating improved functioning of GABA, the neurotransmitter associated with calming and relaxing.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog:

Anxiety and depression: The hidden link

Whether you’re 18 or 80, lifestyle may be more important than age in determining dementia risk, study reveals

A new Baycrest study has found that individuals with no dementia risk factors – such as smoking, diabetes or hearing loss – have similar brain health as people who are 10 to 20 years younger than them.

The study is one of the first to look at lifestyle risk factors for dementia across the entire lifespan & found that a single dementia risk factor could reduce cognition by the equivalent of up to three years of aging.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog:

Healthy ageing: nutrition and lifestyle support

Could eating fruit more often keep depression at bay?

People who frequently eat fruit are more likely to report greater positive mental wellbeing and are less likely to report symptoms of depression than those who do not, according to new research from the College of Health and Life Sciences, Aston University.

The researchers’ findings suggest that how often we eat fruit is more important to our psychological health than the total amount we consume during a typical week.

Published in the British Journal of Nutrition, the study surveyed 428 adults from across the UK and looked at the relationship between their consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweet and savoury food snacks, and their psychological health.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog:

Link Between Gut and Depression

 


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