In the news – health and nutrition research

In this week’s article, we provide a roundup of some of the most recent health and nutrition related articles in the news, five items comprising:

  • Beyond fat and sugar: Diets low in whole grains, fruit and nuts associated with 1 in 5 deaths
  • Light, physical activity reduces brain ageing
  • Walking to work ‘can cut the risk of death posed by sitting’
  • Experts warn of fatty liver disease ‘epidemic’ in young people
  • Mental health support for girls affected by social media


Beyond fat and sugar: Diets low in whole grains, fruit and nuts associated with 1 in 5 deaths

A suboptimal diet lacking in whole grains, fruit, nuts and seeds, vegetables and omega-3 fatty acids is responsible for more deaths than any other risk factors globally, according to findings published in The Lancet.

The Global Burden of Disease report, which tracked consumption trends of 15 dietary factors in 195 countries between 1990 and 2017, concluded that one in five deaths are associated with poor diet.

In 2017, this figure equated to 11 million deaths. More than five million of these occurred among adults under 70 years of age. In addition, poor diet was associated with 25 million of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) among adults during this time.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Your guide to eating well


Light, physical activity reduces brain ageing

Incremental physical activity, even at light intensity is associated with larger brain volume and healthy brain ageing.

Considerable evidence suggests that engaging in regular physical activity may prevent cognitive decline and dementia. Active individuals have low metabolic and vascular risk factors and these risk factors may explain their propensity for healthy brain ageing. However, the specific activity levels optimal for dementia prevention have remained unclear.

The new 2018 Physical Activity-Guidelines for Americans suggest that some physical activity is better than none, but achieving greater than 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous (MV) physical activity per week is recommended for substantial health benefits.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan articles

Delaying and slowing cognitive decline


Walking to work ‘can cut the risk of death posed by sitting’

A brisk walk to and from work could counter the health of being deskbound at work for long periods every day, according to researchers.

They said each hour spent sitting above six hours a day raises your risk of dying from any cause by 4 per cent, but this vanishes if you get at least 300 minutes of moderate or vigorous exercise a week. This is equivalent to a half-hour walk to work and back, on five days a week.

Researchers found that while 150 to 199 minutes of exercise a week greatly offset the risk of death associated with extended sitting, those who got 300 to 419 minutes cancelled it out.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Exercise – Can there be too much of a good thing?


Experts warn of fatty liver disease ‘epidemic’ in young people

Experts are warning that high levels of fatty liver disease among young people, caused by being overweight, could signal a potential public health crisis.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is fairly common among older adults, detectable in about a quarter of the population. But a study has found that substantial numbers of 24-year-olds are also affected, putting them at risk of serious later health problems, such as liver cancer, type-2 diabetes and heart attacks.

Researchers from Bristol University tested more than 4,000 young people enrolled in a longitudinal study called the Children of the 90s, set up to follow the lives and health of children born in 1991 and 1992 in Avon, England.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Sugar intake in Children – more than just a weight issue


Mental health support for girls affected by social media

New measures to tackle a reported rise in mental health problems among young girls linked to social media use have been announced.

It follows a report for the Scottish government which also highlighted sleep disruption, body image and school pressures as contributory factors. Ministers have now committed £90,000 to produce advice on the healthy use of social media.

A review on screen use and its effect on mental health has also been ordered. Health minister Clare Haughey said the government was committed to helping all young people “to grow up in a modern Scotland with good mental wellbeing”.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

The link between diet and depression


If you have any questions regarding the topics that have been raised, or any other health matters, please do contact me (Clare) by phone or email at any time.

[email protected], 01684 310099

Clare Daley and the Cytoplan Editorial Team


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