In the news – health and nutrition research

In this week’s article, we provide a roundup of some of the most recent health and nutrition related articles in the news, five items comprising:

  • Study looks into whether picky eating habits follow a child into adolescence
  • Top UK scientist urges people to take vitamin D supplements
  • Disrupted sleep patterns can lead to ‘deviant behaviour’, research suggests
  • Gut bacteria regulation a target for easing anxiety, suggests review
  • For the sake of our health, we need to kick the indoor habit


Study looks into whether picky eating habits follow a child into adolescence

Do picky eating habits when children are toddlers follow them into their teenage years? And should parents be concerned that their picky eaters aren’t getting as many nutrients as their non-picky eater peers?

Univerity of Bristol, UK, researchers examined food questionnaires and records of children in the ‘Children of the 90s’ study to find out if those identified as picky eaters at 3-years-old had differences in their diet by the time they were aged 10 and again at 13 years old compared to non-picky eaters in the study.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Your guide to eating well 


Top UK scientist urges people to take vitamin D supplements

One of Britain’s leading scientists has urged people to take vitamin D supplements, particularly children, who spend an hour less outside than they did 10 years ago.

The geneticist Steve Jones told the Hay literary festival in Wales the health case for taking them was now overwhelming. “I never thought I would be a person who would take vitamin supplements, I always thought it was absolute nonsense, it’s homeopathy. I now take vitamin D every day,” he said.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Vitamin D – functions, forms and latest research


Disrupted sleep patterns can lead to ‘deviant behaviour’, research suggests

Finally, workers have a new excuse for stealing pens from the office or using someone else’s milk: early risers and night owls are more likely to display “unethical and deviant” behaviour if forced to work outside their natural rhythms, and should be able to set their own hours accordingly.

Speaking at Hay Festival on Monday about light and circadian rhythms, science journalists and author Linda Geddes called for more workplaces to introduce “flexi-working” to accommodate different chronotypes, which are most often split into two groups: larks, who peak in energy and mood in the mornings, and owls, who perform best later in the day.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Breaking the vicious cycle of poor sleep and Alzheimer’s disease


Gut bacteria regulation a target for easing anxiety, suggests review

Probiotic and non-probiotic food and supplements that regulate gut microorganisms may ease a number of anxiety symptoms, suggests a review of studies.

A team of Chinese scientists found that over half of the studies, which featured probiotic and non-probiotic interventions could regulate the intestinal microbiota and in turn anxiety symptoms.

Further analysis found non-probiotic interventions to be more effective than probiotic interventions as the authors suggest a changing diet (a diverse energy source) as having of an impact on gut bacteria growth than introducing specific types of bacteria in a probiotic supplement.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Gut flora – the gatekeeper of your health? 


For the sake of our health, we need to kick the indoor habit

As a species we need to get out more. Humans now spend so much time indoors that many of us are cultivating a variety of serious health complaints, and for some they could be fatal. It is not so much that outdoor time is inherently good; more that our bodies are built to anticipate it and the way we live now is confusing to our systems.

Nearly two decades ago a study published in Nature magazine concluded that the average American spent 93% of their time indoors. And that was before tablets and smartphones.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Exercise – can there be too much of a good thing?


If you have questions regarding the topics that have been raised, or any other health matters, please do contact me (Clare) by phone or email at any time.

[email protected], 01684 310099

Clare Daley and the Cytoplan Editorial Team


Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmail

We'd love your comments on this article
It's easy, just post your questions, comments or feedback below

Names will be displayed as entered. Your email address will not be published. Required *