All posts by cytoffice

In the news – health and nutrition research

In this week’s article we provide a roundup of some of the most recent health and nutrition related articles to be in the news, five items comprising:

  • Screen-time linked to greater diabetes risk among children
  • Vitamin D deficiency may indicate cardiovascular disease in overweight and obese children
  • Doctor’s Diary: Can Omega-3 oils help fight depression?
  • Mixed carotenoid supplements may help obese children
  • High fibre diet ‘could prevent type 1 diabetes’

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The importance of personalised nutrition for optimum performance and health

The importance of nutrition in sport was first recognised by the ancient Olympians and today, there remains wide spread acceptance of its role in improving sports performance as well as general health. In fact it has been stated “no single factor plays a greater role in optimizing performance than diet”.

Our blog this week has been written by Miranda Harris, Nutritional Therapist, University Lecturer and keen athlete. Miranda will be talking at our May event about the physical and psychological effects of exercise on the body’s systems and how a personalised nutritional approach can play a part in enhancing individual performance, while maintaining optimum health and helping to prevent injury and aid recovery. In this week’s blog Miranda focuses on the importance of the right type, quantities and timing of macronutrients. Continue reading  ▶

Gout – Signs, symptoms and nutritional support

Gout is an inflammatory form of arthritis and is a condition that is believed to affect around 1 in 50 people around the United Kingdom. As quoted on the NHS website: “Gout is a type of arthritis in which small crystals form inside and around the joints. It causes sudden attacks of severe pain and swelling.”

In this week’s blog we look at some of the most common signs and symptoms of gout, its link with high levels of uric acid, and nutritional considerations.

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The link between stress and brain health

The effects of stress are well reported in relation to many health conditions, for example, cardiovascular health. What has received less media attention are the effects of stress on brain health.

Stress begins in the brain. As information comes in through our ears and eyes it travels to several parts of the brain. When an individual perceives stress (anything from pain to a maths test) the body interprets and processes the threat in an area of the brain called the amygdala. From there the amygdala switches on two other systems – the hormone system and a branch of the nervous system called the sympathetic nervous system.

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In the news – health and nutrition research

In this week’s article we provide a roundup of some of the most recent health and nutrition related articles to be in the news, four items comprising:

  • Gut bacteria impacts intestine behaviour in IBS patients
  • Omega 3 could decrease mortality rate in postmenopausal women, study suggests
  • Low gluten diets linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetes
  • B vitamins may have ‘protective effect’ against air pollution

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