In the news – health and nutrition research

In this week’s article, we provide a roundup of some of the most recent health and nutrition related articles in the news, five items comprising:

  • Melancholic microbiome? EU-backed project publishes recommendations for diet and mood
  • Exercise after the age of 60 may prevent heart disease
  • Ground-breaking study links inflammation with ‘mental sluggishness’  for the first time
  • Short sleep may harm bone health in older women
  • The five exercises to help avoid an early death


Melancholic microbiome? EU-backed project publishes recommendations for diet and mood

People with depression or vulnerability to depression should be encouraged to eat plant-based diets with higher levels of grains, fibres and fish, according to new recommendations published by the MyNetGut consortium.

Led by Professor Ted Dinan from APC Microbiome Ireland and the University College Cork, the expert team reviewed the interplay between diet, mood and the microbiome as part of the EU FP7 project MyNewGut – a five year multidisciplinary initiative set up to investigate the role of our gut microbiome in obesity and behavioural disorders.

“Depression is a highly prevalent disorder which exerts a major economic impact in all European countries,”​ noted the authors – adding that the condition is “not only the common cold of psychiatric disorders but one of the most prevalent medical conditions.”

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog

The link between gut and depression


Exercise after the age of 60 may prevent heart disease

A study finds that increased activity over the age of 60 can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

While it is common for people to become less active as age takes a toll on one’s physical capabilities, a study just published in the European Heart Journal finds that either maintaining levels of activity or becoming more active at this stage of life is important for reducing the risks of heart attack and stroke.

The researchers found that study participants who reduced their levels of exercise over time had a 27% greater likelihood of developing heart and blood vessel issues. Those who became more active reduced their risk by as much as 11%.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog

Cardiovascular health and phytonutrients 


Ground-breaking study links inflammation with ‘mental sluggishness’  for the first time

A link has been discovered between mental fatigue and physical inflammation, say scientists.

The correlation could explain why sufferers of chronic medical conditions often report severe mental “sluggishness”, alongside physical symptoms.

A joint research project between the University of Alabama and the University of Birmingham investigated the links between inflammation – how the body responds to illness – and the mental “fog” described by those living with chronic pain.

Results showed that inflammation specifically affected areas of the brain responsible for staying alert. However, the other attention processes weren’t affected by bodily inflammation.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog

Chronic fatigue syndrome is linked to high levels of inflammatory molecules – new study


Short sleep may harm bone health in older women

New research in postmenopausal women has found that those who slept for no longer than 5 hours per night were most likely to have lower bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis.

A team from the University at Buffalo, NY, led the study of 11,084 postmenopausal women.

The investigation follows an earlier one in which the team had linked short sleep to a higher likelihood of bone fracture in women.

“Our study suggests that sleep may negatively impact bone health, adding to the list of the negative health impacts of poor sleep,” says lead study author Heather M. Ochs-Balcom, Ph.D., an associate professor of epidemiology and environmental health at the University at Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions.

“I hope,” she adds, “that it can also serve as a reminder to strive for the recommended 7 or more hours of sleep per night for our physical and mental health.”

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog

Osteoporosis – protecting your bones for the future


The five exercises to help avoid an early death

Easy-to-access activities that help to reduce blood pressure, cholesterol and the risk of heart disease.

Scientists attempting to find the health benefits of different sports found that regular tennis and badminton sessions reduce the risk of death at any given age by 47%. The study, published by the British Journal of Sports Medicine, gathered responses from over 80,000 adults aged 30 and over, through surveys taken between 1994 and 2008. It also found that running can reduce the risk of early death regardless of how long or at what speed you run.

In addition to improving strength, breathing and flexibility, yoga has been found to reduce risk factors for heart disease, such as high body mass index, cholesterol and blood pressure.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blog

Supporting health during exercise and training


If you have any questions regarding the topics that have been raised, or any other health matters, please do contact me (Clare) by phone or email me at any time.

clare@cytoplan.co.uk, 01684 310099

Clare Daley and the Cytoplan Editorial Team


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