In the news – health and nutrition research

In this week’s article, we provide a roundup of some of the most recent health and nutrition related articles in the news, four items comprising:

  • Micronutrient gaps in childbearing years ‘concerning,’ survey stresses
  • Rise in type 2 diabetes in young people in England and Wales
  • Low DHA and EPA a ‘strong risk factor’ for preterm birth: Danish data
  • Air pollution may harm cognitive intelligence study says


Micronutrient gaps in childbearing years ‘concerning,’ survey stresses

Females and younger adults in the UK appear to be vulnerable to micronutrient shortfalls, a concern given this life period includes the conception and childbearing years, the survey’s author warns.

The survey, which quizzed 3,238 adults, aged 20 to 59, found high numbers of both men and women in the 20- to 29-year-old group potentially having potassium (24.7%), zinc (8.6%) and calcium (9.4%) deficiencies.

“These shortfalls are more prominent amongst females and young adults in their twenties,” said Dr Emma Derbyshire, study author and director of consultancy firm Nutritional Insight.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Fertility and pregnancy – the importance of nutrition 


Rise in type 2 diabetes in young people in England and Wales

The number of children and young people being treated for type 2 diabetes in England and Wales has gone up from 507 to 715 in four years, new figures show.

More than three-quarters were also obese, according to NHS data. Child health experts said the rise was “alarming” and the childhood obesity epidemic was “starting to bite”.  Councils said more needed to be done to tackle the obesity crisis in children, particularly among minority ethnic groups, who were most affected.

Type 2 diabetes can lead to a range of health problems such as heart disease, strokes and kidney problems. The condition occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. It can be linked to obesity.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Diabetes and insulin resistance

Sugar intake in Children – more than just a weight issue

The role of stress in the onset of type 2 diabetes


Low DHA and EPA a ‘strong risk factor’ for preterm birth: Danish data

Pregnant women with low plasma levels of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in their first and second trimesters may be at a significantly higher risk of early preterm birth, new research suggests.

The data, published in EBioMedicine, suggests that low blood concentrations of certain long chain fatty acids – specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) – may be a ‘strong risk factor’ for preterm birth.

Preterm birth is a major cause of neonatal death and is linked to a raft of health issues during development and later life including cognitive deficiencies and cardiometabolic problems.

Read the full article here. 

Related Cytoplan blogs

Omega 3 Fatty Acids – EPA, DHA & ALA 

Omega 3 supplements – making the appropriate choice 


Air pollution may harm cognitive intelligence study says

Chronic exposure to air pollution could be linked to cognitive performance, a new study in China suggests.

Researchers believe that the negative impact increases with age, and affects men with less education the worst. Over four years, the maths and verbal skills of some 20,000 people in China were monitored by the US-Chinese study.

Researchers believe the results have global relevance with more than 80% of the world’s urban population breathing unsafe levels of air pollution. However, while establishing a link between pollution and lower test scores, the study did not prove cause and effect.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

How stress rewires the brain

The Bredesen Protocol – Is nutrition the key to Alzheimer’s? 


If you have any questions regarding the topics that have been raised, or any other health matters please do contact me (Clare) by phone or email at any time.

clare@cytoplan.co.uk, 01684 310099

Clare Daley and the Cytoplan Editorial Team


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