In the news – health & nutrition research

In this week’s article, we provide a roundup of some of the most recent health and nutrition related articles in the news, five items comprising:

    • New research: Zinc holds diabetes prevention promise
    • 100m bacteria a day keep the doctor away, apple research suggests
    • Micronutrient deficiencies: Researchers discover change in celiac disease symptoms
    • Dementia: Lifestyle changes that could lower your risk
    • Insomnia sufferers can benefit from therapy, new study shows


New research: Zinc holds diabetes prevention promise

Zinc supplementation may have clinical potential for preventing or managing diabetes, according to researchers from China after conducting a systematic review and comprehensive meta-analysis of 32 studies.

The meta-analysis, published in The American Jounal of Clinical Nutrition, reveals that several key glycemic indicators are significantly reduced by zinc supplementation in subjects with diabetes.

Researchers from Zhejiand University School of Medicine, in Hangzhou, analysed 32 published randomised placebo-controlled interventions from 36 publications from PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, involving a total of 1700 participants in 14 countries.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

All about zinc – what you need to know about this vital mineral


100m bacteria a day keep the doctor away, apple research suggests

The impact of an apple a day in keeping the doctor away may be partly down to the beneficial bacteria it carries and their subsequent colonisation of your gut, according to scientists.

A study has found that a typical apple carries more than 100m bacteria. Some of these microbes are important in maintaining a healthy gut environment, or microbiome, says Prof Gabriele Berg from Graz University of Technology, Austria, one of the authors of the research.

Read the full article here. 

Related Cytoplan blogs

Probiotics – what are they and how do they work?

Supporting your gut with ‘functional foods’


Micronutrient deficiencies: Researchers discover change in celiac disease symptoms

Micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamins B12 and D, as well as folate, iron, zinc and copper, are common in adults with celiac disease and must be addressed at that time of diagnosis, according to a new study.

Mayo Clinic researchers carried out the retrospective study of 309 adults newly diagnosed with celiac disease for 2000 to 2014 and found that low body weight and weight loss – usually associated with celiac disease – were less common than expected.

The study, to be published in the July issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, found that weight loss was seen in only 25.2% of patients, and the average body mass index was actually categorised as overweight.

Read the full article here. 

Related Cytoplan blog

A gluten-free diet – healthier or not?


Dementia: Lifestyle changes that could lower your risk

Nearly everyone can lower their risk of dementia, even if it runs in the family, by living a healthy lifestyle, research suggests. The study of nearly 200,000 people showed the risk fell by up to a third.

The team at the University of Exeter said the results were exciting, empowering and showed people were not doomed to get dementia. The findings were revealed at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference.

What counts as a healthy lifestyle?

The researchers gave people a healthy lifestyle score based on a combination of exercise, diet, alcohol and smoking.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

Lifestyle interventions to support brain health 


Insomnia sufferers can benefit from therapy, new study shows

Forget counting sheep and drinking warm milk, an effective way to tackle chronic insomnia is cognitive behavioural therapy, researchers have confirmed.

The authors of a new study say that although the therapy is effective, it is not being used widely enough, with doctors having limited knowledge about it and patient slacking access.

“There is a very effective treatment that doesn’t involve medication that should be available through your primary care service. If it’s not, it should be,” said Dr Judith Davidson, co-author of a new study on CBT for insomnia from Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada.

Read the full article here.

Related Cytoplan blogs

The Practice of Mindfulness – Part 1 

The Practice of Mindfulness – Part 2


If you have questions regarding the topics that have been raised, or any other health matters, please do contact me (Clare) by phone or email at any time.

clare@cytoplan.co.uk, 01684 310099

Clare Daley and the Cytoplan Editorial Team


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2 thoughts on “In the news – health & nutrition research

  1. The reason people have problems sleeping these days is often due to lack of Melatonin, which is part of the sun vitamins. Also, the sun screen creams and lotions put on our skins, to protect against the damaging sun rays, prevent both vitamin D, with Melatonin, from penetrating the skin surface. Thus a lack of this vital nutrient. I bought Melatonin (unfortunately too high a dose of 10 mg) which I crunch into a powder (keeping the contents – usually one or two tablets – in a small container. I then just lick my finger, dipping it lightly in this powder and licking it off adding a little water shortly before going to bed. This works wonders. But, I must stress , do not take too much – 0.5 mg is enough.

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